4 Step vs 5 Step Approach For Beginners – #RadicalRundown

Welcome back to the #RadicalRundown!

Today, Phil and Ronnie are talking about whether beginners should start with a 4 step or 5 step approach.

As always, if you have questions or comments or want to let us know how many steps you took when you first started out, let us know!

#WOWThatsRadical #RadicalRevolution

4 Comments on “4 Step vs 5 Step Approach For Beginners – #RadicalRundown”

  1. I began with 4 steps, went to 5 steps about 10 years ago (31 yo now). However, most pros are using 5 step approaches. It seems like 5 steps are either what coaches are teaching all over the world or that 5 steps are more successful.

    For me, all the important stuff happen on the last 4 steps of the approach (1 handed bowlers), if you take 6 steps or 4 steps don’t really matter that much. In the end, all bowling is about is to knock down pins. If you do it better than your opponent, that’s good enough.

    1. I believe 5 steps is easier for bowlers to learn, because of the inertia and momentum it creates before the push away. The difficulty of a 4 step, is that your first step and the push away happen at the same time, and you’re starting from zero, which can cause inconsistencies. As they alluded to in the video, the first step ends up being entirely a timing mechanic, where you use the natural flow of the body, to time the push away with your 2nd step. In a 4 step, you have to manually time the push away and your first step simultaneously, and because the ball is not already in motion, it requires more force to do so.
      Having said all that, I use 4 steps, lmao.

    2. @Kenny Grinols Good analysis. At 79 I have gone 4 then 5 back and forth over the years. At one time I changed in a series because of lane conditions. I now settle on a short 1st step and then 4. A concern is be careful if your right foot is a crossover which can throw off your direction. I believe Norm Duke talks about this style.

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